#399 — August 17, 2018 Read on the Web JavaScript Weekly A blast from the past this week as we take some time out to ask Dr. Axel Rauschmayer, a former editor of JavaScript Weekly, some questions on the release of his new book,...

#398 — August 10, 2018 Read on the Web JavaScript Weekly Electron Fiddle: A Playground for Electron Experiments — Want to quickly experiment with Electron (a cross-platform JS desktop app environment) development? Electron ...

#397 — August 3, 2018 Read on the Web JavaScript Weekly The Cost of JavaScript in 2018 — We linked the video of Addy’s talk a month ago, but now here’s the detailed write-up of Addy’s thoughts and findings on how much effe...

#396 — July 27, 2018 Read on the Web JavaScript Weekly If you've not ventured to the end of an issue of JavaScript Weekly recently, you'll be missing some of the bonus links or 'golden oldies' we've been running — this issue ha...

This video series mirrors the blog post series on creating a functional application in JavaScript. This will map closely with the third post of that series. We will cover how easy it is to setup testing when the code is functional. Watch and enjoy! The post Practical Functional JavaScript: Testing V...

This video series mirrors the blog post series on creating a functional application in JavaScript. This will map closely with the second post of that series. We will cover putting our functional backend together with the DOM. This is where the application becomes a useful item and not just a bunch o...

It seems that I make this post every so often. My last post was made all the way back in February. That was already 5 months ago. I don’t think that many people “follow” my posts, but I know there are some that use RSS. Ultimately my plan is, as always, to have quality content R...

I have made a video to go alongside my last post series. In that series, I focused on showing what it means to write practical functional Javascript. Just like all my other posts, this is done by building something, a Mad Libs generator. The problems that arise from building a Mad Libs generator are...

Download the src(github) View the demo This is the final post in a three-part series. The first post dealt with building a functional foundation and the second post was about building a functional UI. This post will be about testing everything. Testing Testing is very important, but sometimes it get...

Download the src(github) View the demo This is the second post of a two-part series. The first post covered building a functional back-end for making Mad Libs. We will focus on the front end. React and Redux are not actually used in the code, but they are used in execution. I will show the reason &#...

Download the src(github) View the demo I am continuing my path towards functional programming that I have been dabbling with the last year or so. This usually meant I would build things object-oriented for the most part, but then anytime an Array popped up I would transform it using functional patte...

Using functional design is the new cool thing. This is especially true when talking about JavaScript. Functional programming can make complex code much simpler and much shorter. I am going to highlight some code that I wrote for my Packt Publishing video course, The Complete Guide to Node.js. I want...

I just finished an amazing book by Luis Atencio named Functional Programming in JavaScript. It is published by Manning and you can purchase it from Manning. If you have been reading my blog you will see that I have been trying to push myself further into the functional paradigm. I have been classica...

I have another video series ready from Packt Publishing named Build Complex Express Sites with Redis and Socket.io. This course builds on the foundation from the other course I built for Packt Publishing earlier this year, The Complete Guide to Node.js. It starts off by covering what and why of Redi...

Back in February we announced the Nodejitsu team was joining GoDaddy we told our existing users that we would be ending the Nodejitsu Platform-as-a-Service in seven months. Based on a variety of factors the Nodejitsu team has decided to continue supporting the Nodejitsu Platform-as-a-Service until D...

In 2010, Nodejitsu started with a simple idea: a company with Open Source in its DNA creating essential productivity tools focused on a new platform that most people had never heard of or were already dismissive of: Node.js. Back then the server-side JavaScript ecosystem was fragmented and diverse; ...

This is a guest post from Alex Gorbatchev over at npmawesome.com. Nodejitsu loved what npmawesome.com was doing and is now supporting the project. redislock (GitHub: danielstjules/redislock, License: MIT) by Daniel St. Jules is a module for distributed locking powered by Redis. This utility is...

This is a guest post from Alex Gorbatchev over at npmawesome.com. Nodejitsu loved what npmawesome.com was doing and is now supporting the project. os-monitor (GitHub: lfortin/node-os-monitor, License: MIT) by Laurent Fortin is a very handy utility module to help you monitor basic stats of the ...

This is a guest post from Alex Gorbatchev over at npmawesome.com. Nodejitsu loved what npmawesome.com was doing and is now supporting the project. stepup (GitHub: CrabDude/stepup, License: MIT) by Adam Crabtree is a simple control-flow library that makes parallel execution, serial execution, a...

This is a guest post from Alex Gorbatchev over at npmawesome.com. Nodejitsu loved what npmawesome.com was doing and is now supporting the project. NeDB (GitHub: louischatriot/nedb, License: MIT) by Louis Chatriot is an embedded persistent database with no dependencies. It implements a subset ...

< Older